Starting Off On The Right Foot | Matty Ferguson’s Honda S2000

Finally. I get to write a feature after the 23 months consisting of Japan stuff, a load of event coverage, a brief bit about an MX-5 specialist and his R33 GT-R, some more car shows, and most recently the introduction of Civik. So yeah, alot has occurred since my last and debut feature I decided to kategorize as a ‘Fokal Point’ article, which some of you might remember involving Josh Harbour and his R32 GT-R. If not, you can catch up on that here.

One of, if not the primary, reasons for me signing up to a WordPress subsription and purchasing a web domain was that I wanted to be able to share my experiences on this planet as a carboy. But I’ve always known – even if not consciously – that the reason magazines and online blogs appealed to me so much were the inspirational glimpses of the people behind the assembly of metal, glass, rubber and plastic.

Yeah, the cars are cool and all that, but the journey people go through alongside their personalised mode of transport is what always captured and captivated my attention. At the end of the day, our vehicles are just the medium through which we convey our feelings brought on by how the car drives or what the vehicle represents.

So when Hamza and I were taking a stroll along the paddock of Croft Circuit during Mimms Honda Day in July of this year, I nearly twisted my vertebrae beyond repair when my eyes were magnetically drawn to Matty’s Honda S2000. The way the car just sat there next to a bright red Audi R8 and managed to detract all of the German supercar’s presence, I knew instantly this roadster deserved more than a one-take glance.

The upload count of shots posted up in the threepart blog should provide clear indication of how much of my interest was piqued by this two-seat Honda from 1999. After the show was done and over with, going through the images from that day, I realised how much Matty’s S2000 stood out to me.

Why, you might be wondering?

Well, I’m gonna let the photos show you exactly why this S2000 is an up-and-coming build that’s about to get even sicker than it already is.

We’d arranged to meet in his hometown near Darlington, somewhere I’ve only been once, and that was for a company training workshop, but that’s besides the point.

I scoped out a location to shoot Matty’s car in that wasn’t too far from where he was based. Early that morning I headed straight to our agreed meeting point, where I was having a little pre-shoot scout. Matty messaged me and invited me to his house as he was still cleaning up the motor since he didn’t find the time to the night before.

I drove over to his, parked my car up and we chit-chatted as he went over his favourite points on the car.

Turns out the evening before that morning was a bit of a episode involving Matty’s friend’s seized brake caliper off of his Mini Cooper S. He almost thought his bone was broken/fractured in his ankle, due to a caliper piston rewind tool going haywire from being used in conjunction with an impact drill (not recommended).

It is what it is though, shit does and will happen. We weren’t working to a strict schedule or nothing, it was a Saturday after all, and I think 8am on a weekend is like 6am on a weekday, so early enough as is.

An S2000 is a highly-versatile chassis, and that is mostly down its outright good-looks. You don’t have to do much to the car in the cosmetics department, since Honda’s designers did a grand job on perfecting the exterior of the car to a point where there isn’t an angle from which you’ll grow tired from looking at it.

Matty informed me of the date he took ownership of his 2005 model-year, hardtop S2000, and I was kinda taken aback by how recent I’d thought it was: June 2020. For some reason, I felt as if the car had been carefully crafted over a longer period of time, going through a couple phases before this one. But, no. Matty bought the Honda in factory trim, still wearing its original coats of Silverstone Metallic, with the only visible modification being a K&N Cone Air Filter.

The S2000 has always appeared cartoonish when viewed from the front, head-on. It’s as if the design engineers intentionally gave the car a personable character.

Now, there’s not much to say about Matty’s car, and that’s in no way me being dismissive, of course. The fact I don’t need to say much about the car, theres’s no need for me to be throwing all these fancy adjectives up just for you to take more notice of the details, so that in and of itself speaks more volume than I ever could. I mean, if you can’t appreciate this awfully simplistic method of modifying, then maybe you’re expecting too much.

Understandably so, with the amount of things we’re bombarding ourselves with via social media, you can’t help but be desensitized to anything that’s truly relatable. Until, perhaps, you stumble across something like this car for the first time ever, IRL, no filter, no bullshit promo, no hashtags. Just a real enthusiast showing how he likes his cars by putting together an example that is undeniably well-finished.

Obviously, I don’t mean finished in the literal sense, as whilst I was snapping away with my DSLR on this random research building’s carpark, Matty told me of his vision and this is most definitely not that, yet.

But let’s stick with what we have in the present.

What exactly are we all looking at here?

The “elephant in the room”, for me anyways, certainly has to be the non-Honda body colour. Initially, I’d assumed the “Tahitian Green Pearl” paint code was nabbed from the CR-Xs and EF/EG Civics, and pasted all over the S2000’s panels, but that colour is much more vibrant in retrospect. This shade of blue-green remains quite deep and subdued under direct sunlight, and frankly, the Honda pulls off Emerald Green miles better than the sourced-from Citroen C4 Cactus ever could.

By the way, the colour change was the very first alteration Matty chose to make to his car once he became its rightful owner. Although, from what he told me, it was a bit of a nightmare back-and-forth scenario with the bodyshop not completing the job to a standard you’d expect for the respray of a modern classic sports-roadster. Putting the past aside, the car’s bodywork was of course refinished properly and retrieved back to the hands of its owner for further tweaks to be made.

Fortunately, the low-hanging fog that morning muted all but our immediate surroundings, and the photos came out better than I’d imagined they would. I’m going to come across as arrogrant, but I have to admit that this is the best work I’ve produced thus far in my life as a person with a camera.

Back to the subject in fokus…

Once Matty got his whip back in the home garage, the tone was set for him to begin riffing off and enhance what was already at that point a great-looking car in its new lick of paint.

S2000s weren’t all that tip-toey off the showroom floor with their factory-spec suspension and ride height. Most definitely not as bad as a standard MX-5, but still, there’s always far too much tyre-to-arch clearance with standard cars, unless you’re buying a 911 GT3 or similar.

Matty selected a set of coilovers made by MeisterR, a company that has bases in the UK & USA. The choice Zeta CRDs have brought the ride height to a very acceptable distance to the ground, and tightened up the existing well-balanced chassis giving the driver just enough tactile feedback without compromising usability on the road, helped by the 9kg(F) & 7kg(R) spring rates.

By the way, the owner isn’t some up-and-coming YouTube sensation or a Forex trader’s prodigy. Yeah he’s a young guy in his early 20’s, but he’s still studying part-time whilst working a full-time job in the civil engineering sector. And he hasn’t rolled his car into a garage, tossed them the keys and demand for them to turn it into some kind of Insta-famous riceboi machine. Matty and his pals have all chipped in and carried out the work themselves, that includes fine tuning the suspension to get it cock-on without the tyre chafing against the inner arches and busting a tyre.

So, as you can see, not much is “going on” under the bonnet where the F20C engine resides. Time and resource will eventually come around for the owner to invest some of his attention to the powertrain, but all in good time. As it sits currently, the only alterations made to the engine are its Invidia Q300 catback stainless exhaust system allowing the F-series to emit it’s waste gases freely, but keeping the neighbours happy(ish) with a high-flow catalytic converter made by Berk Technology / Magnaflow.

Oh yeah, and if you didn’t spot it, an oil cap from Spoon Sports keeps a lid on things.

As Matty propped up the vented OEM bonnet, immediately grasping my attention was this piece sitting right on top of the Koyorad “Half-Size” aluminium thick-core radiator. If you’ve followed my Civik blog series, you’ll know that I was a bit miffed how my J’s Racing pressure cap wouldn’t fit onto my Koyorad rad. I was baffled as to how Matty’s fits and why I don’t have the same luck as him, haha 😦

15+ year old rubber most likely were not in the best of condition, so Matty went and chucked on some Spoon Sports polymer hoses for piece of mind.

I can imagine those of you who happen to be S2000 owners too, are interested in Matty’s choice of wheel and their fitment.

And if you happen not to show intrigue, are you okay? The flow-formed RG-D2 wheels by Yokohama Advan are a difficult option to discount when configuring your dream build, regardless of the chassis, they look great on everything! Matty chose to fit up a set of staggered 17″ wheels, 8J at the front, with 9J in the back, offsets measuring ET44 and ET45 respectively.

And I can’t not mention one of the greatest tread patterns of all time, courtesy of the Yokohama Rubber Company. AD08RS compound has been equipped to deal with everything input by the hands and feet of the driver, matching up to the staggered wheel sizing with 225/45 and 245/40 tyre specifications.

The Advan wheels’s polished lips gleam as they offset the Racing Hyper Black spoke faces.

Efforts have been made by Matty to ensure that the car appears as low as possible, without giving off that “stancey wanker” vibe. He’s done a damn good job if you ask me.

How is this car still relevant as ever? Honda, bring back an affordable high-performance FR two-seat sportscar, please, before you go all “Greenpeace” on us petrol-junkies.

Back onto the subject of the aero trim applied to the exterior of the car. A carbon fibre ducktail partly left bare to exposed the weave when viewed from the rear, carbon fibre sideskirt extensions made for an FD3S RX-7, and the smoothed OEM “AP2” front bumper & original lip spolier. A Voltex rear diffuser made of CFRP wasn’t in the best of shape so Matty chose to remove it from the car in case the damage went any further, but you can see it photographed here, if you so please.

Without sounding cliche, sitting passenger whilst Matty directed the S2000 through fast and slow B-road bends, I could sense a link between man and machine where both were in harmony as G-forces pulled the ~1270kg mass dynamically whilst the four tyres maintained grip throughout.

I jumped out the car to take a few panning shots as Matty zipped past me on a country lane. Thought I’d get some practice shots in with the local wildlife behind me.

The car isn’t crazily loud, but it sings a tune you wouldn’t want any other way.

When something looks as good as it goes, a sense of temporary bliss comes into effect. This was one of those moments.

Before we called it quits, Matty suggested a cool photo-opp spot not too far out in the countryside.

We drove up to a pair of electric gates that opened automatically, rolled right through all the way down this long-ass driveway, realising that we may or may not have been trespassing, haha.

We weren’t doing no one any harm, so I got Matty to position the roadster in the middle of this random household’s driveway, and let the shutter release.

Next thing we know, a lady in a new Land Rover Defender enters the premises and I’m thinking we’re about to get booted out or maybe worse! But Matty must have done some sweet-talking as I heard her compliment the Honda that was on her private property. She was 100% cool with us being there, we kept off the grass, and that was that, she just carried on for another 5-miles (exagerrating lol) to her doorstep.

Buddyclub LED Sequential Tailights complete the rear-end without over-doing it. To be honest, it’s probably not far off a “modern-day” interpretation of the S2000, similar to what we saw at TAS 2020 with Honda’s 20th Anniversary Concept, only this has nicer wheels…

That’s all I have to say about Matty’s S2000 right now. It doesn’t “break the internet” (yet) nor does it need to (yet). I’m positively sure that the evolution of this vehicle is in its infancy under the careful and particular owner.

Keep an eye out, is all I need to say, both right here on soulfokus.net and Matty’s IG @mattyfer5.

| B O N U S G A L L E R Y |

Not Worth the Kompromise | Japanese Performance Show 2021 @ TIC

Shows are always enjoyable, more so after the drought we’ve been through these past couple of years. Not counting Mimms North in September 2020, the last indoor car show I’d visited was Osaka Auto Messe, so yeah it’s been a while.

Never having witnessed Japanese Performance Show (JPS) live and direct, I’d made the decision to check it out. So, after the Mimms Croft blog had been posted, I’d messaged Dav Plaha who also happens to organize JPS, asking him whether it was alright for me to advertise my photo printing services on the Facebook group, seen as though some of the shots taken at Croft Circuit turned out well. What I didn’t expect Dav to say was, “Why don’t you attend as a vendor and sell your prints at the show”. As we know, with life, the spontaneity and unexpectedness of it tends to end up one of two ways. Better than we ever could imagined, or disastrous. Then again, life is full of nuance…

I accepted Dav’s offered suggestion and began planning everything out in my head. I’m not very practical when it comes to planning. What I mean by that is, I visualize all the details in my head, or atleast try to, before actually producing anything tangible. To be honest, I just did things my way, and kept it as simple as possible. I didn’t have enough money for a gazebo or a load of easels to display my sample prints. Instead, I got three fold-out tables and a vinyl banner.

I haven’t got any photos of my stall at the show, but it was very basic. I had my 32″ LCD TV set up, allowing everyone passing by to see either me editing photos, or a preset slideshow of sample images of the cars rolling into the show. My Canon printer was sat beside that, whilst I faffed about on my laptop behind them both. Oh, and the Demio was my display easel for this shot of FEED’s “Touge Maou” I have framed up in my bedroom:

It was an early start on the last Sunday of September, as I had to be at Telford International Centre (TIC) – the debuting venue for JPS – at 6am, meaning I’d set off mine at around 4am. Hamza fell sick a few days before, so I’d be going solo and had to set up at double-time.

Matty Ferguson’s Emerald Blue AP2 S2000

As soon as the shutters around the back of TIC opened up for vendors and display-cars, I made an effort to get the stall situated ASAP. My primary objective was to photograph as many cars as possible before the public were allowed in at 10am. After that time, I made sure I was positioned at the stand so that I’d be able to display and print whatever photos I managed to get.

Whilst it was quiet with no visitors in yet, I run-n-gunned as many of the cars parked up inside.

Adam’s JDM is an IG handle I’ve seen about for a while, and had their fleet posted up not far from where I’d set up.

What looks to be Midnight Purple III on this R33 GT-R the team had brought out, matched up with the classic LMGT3 wheel by Nismo coated in bronze. Whilst not everyone is keen on the awkward shape of the R33, this Skyline manages to pull it off.

I’d definitely like to get to know this R34 GT-R more. At first glance, it looked like an old 2000s-era demo car, due to the alien-styling seen in the painted-over tailights and stretched tyre fitment.

This car had an aura none of the other’s had. I can imagine this plastered onto pages of an Option magazine back in the days when factory-bodylines were of no interest to any JDM-nutcase. All I know is that it wear an M’s Factory widebody and sports OZ Racing Pegasus wheels wider than HGV duallies!

An old photo of it I found floating around on a GT-R forum

An FD RX-7 I recognised immediately from when I first saw it in the hands of Rotary Revs, an RX-8 specialist who spent a fair few man-hours getting this car to run right. The owner obviously cherishes it and rightly so.

Jack Ellis’ FD3S RX-7 was excavated out the batcave for JPS

One of the most aggressive-looking pieces of powder-coated aluminium you could put under the arches of a car: the Enkei RS05RR.

John’s TCP Magic-kitted FD3S

This RX-7 on the other hand, was anything but stealthy. The car looked great before its makeover, with a unique front-end I’ve never seen on an FD, but the owner must have gotten bored of its original Silverstone Metallic. I doubt he’s looked back ever since this came out the paint booth.

Tom Lingard’s K24 Sunny Pickup

If trucks aren’t your thing, this old Datsun will make you revalue your beliefs.

Valve cover branding that shouts stratospheric engine speeds.

As if one JDM EP3 Civic Type-R wasn’t uncommonplace enough…

Andy Boyle’s EK9 Civic Type-R with the bonnet propped to let us know the B16B is long gone

Immaculate would be an understatement.

Jamie Padfield’s BB6 Prelude

Equipped with a Rotrex blower, for all that power!

Form hasn’t taken a backseat with this 400bhp+ K-Swap build.

Got a bit carried away kapturing all the details in this RPS13.

The ultimate drift-style, show-spec S13 isn’t complete unless Equip 05 wheels are bolted to its hubs.

Aaron Britton’s S30 240Z in all it’s timeless glory

Awkward as fuck angle, but gonna leave it here regardless, because double-barrel tailpipes.

Garage Mak’s Revolution Type 5 aero-kit was donned by this S15 Silvia.

Kelvin Thomson’s S15 Silvia stays true to Nissan’s original design, apart from the aftermarket tailights and Work Wheels CR sized up from the standard 17″s

On the other end of the Silvia spectrum, this straight-laced S15 Spec-R in pastel grey colour also got my attention.

Miles’ R32 Skyline GT-R, nailing the simple “drop and wheels” method

Don’t understand why I only got one photo of this R32, because it deserved much more attention.

This guy (sorry if you read this, but I forgot your name) had his Jazz rammed full of die-cast models. Speaking to him after the show, and it sounded like business went pretty well, but he still had boxes full of stock remaining.

Gurpal’s R34 Skyline GT-R V-Spec in what most would consider the default paint option

As a photographer, FOMO (fear of missing out) is an ailment that a lot of us are plagued by, incessantly.

So, whilst a lot of the shiny bits attached to an RB26DETT can easily put you in a trance, in the back of my mind I was worried about not grabbing enough photos for me to print and sell. As someone who is trying to make business using my skill-set, I find it hard to become fully committed focusing on that side of photography. Maybe some part of me is trying not to let the hobby become work, in case my appetite for the art runs out.

But kompromise is something we all have to do, so I got one last shot of these two R33s inside, and ran outside to the carpark’s entrance gate.

I’m not going to lie, but for me to shoot any and every car was impossible. Initially, I’d planned for me and Hamza to be able to simultaneously photograph outside and also print/edit the photos inside. Unfortunately, that strategy was a flop since I was flyin’ solo, but I reckon I managed to hold it down for the most part.

Nik Lukas’ Subaru BRAT got this policeman chattin’

Must have been a day out for a few of these rare, obscure coupe utility vehicles sold by Subaru, whom actually never sold them in Japan funnily enough, because I could imagine them going crazy for something like this. Imagine one decked out with a sound system in the cargo bed on a Friday night at Daikoku PA.

OEM R35 GT-R wheels on an Elgrand – why the hell not!

Whilst mums in the UK are doing the school-run in Vauxhall Zafiras and Ford Galaxys…

No generation gap here, the DNA of the Inte-R is unlike anything we have seen since the DC5 bowed out in 2006.

I really do hope the next-generation of Integra doesn’t lose touch with its roots, then again, I think I’m dreaming. If Honda of America is taking charge of the project, I’ve a feeling it’ll be a similar outcome as what we saw with the NC1 NSX.

Up until the point of closing-time, I didn’t touch my cameras due to manning the printing stall throughout the entire day. A lot of people who had their motors parked up inside were requesting photos, but because I missed the majority of them roll-in the evening before, it meant that I had to try and get a shots of them rolling out.

If those of you who asked for prints on the day are reading this, please get in touch via Instagram/Email and I might have some shots you can purchase for delivery!

A celebratory limiter-bash from this camo-wrapped FD. Infused with fuel-oil premix, the byproduct of rotary combustion engulfed half of the exhibition hall.

The Champ White quartet about to make a move. Jamie’s Prelude is either too low to be seen here, or he already wheeled it outside, I’m unsure.

Didn’t see this EF Civic all day (as was the case with a lot of the cars in attendance that day) until it was time to leave. Parked up on its ones, I grabbed a couple shots of it.

Buddyclub P1 SF in white matched up with sensible tyre sizing, sitting good under those vented front wings.

EF J-swap?

Nathan Pickett pictured with his DC5 Integra Type R in the distance

A very low, and pretty wide, R33 Skyline exiting the show through the back shutter, followed by Andy Boyle in his EK9…

… which could be the most well-executed Civic Type-R build in the UK, by far.

Then again, he was with good company. The fitment of this supercharged EP3’s CE28s is bang-on.

John’s RX-7 looking like something out of the Gundam series. Never noticed its centre-exit exhaust when I caught sight of the car indoors. Natural lighting does wonders for cars in front of the lens, hence why I was reluctant shooting cars inside the hall whenever people asked for me to do so.

Zanda leaving the event in her Milano Red DC5.

John Watson’s Corolla GL would pass under the radar in its subtle shade of grey, but a very cool four-door nonetheless.

Chameleon reflex paint – known to the JDM lot as “Maziora” paint named after the brand created by Nippon Paint who are also the company that were behind Mazda’s beautiful Soul Red pigment – ensures this 180SX/200SX gets more than one look by anybody in its vicinity. The StreetTrackLife slap beside the tailpipe is a nice touch, too.

The marmite of wheels: TriForce Zelda by Trial Tuning Spirit of Osaka. I think I tasted marmite once and yeah, it tastes like crap, but these rims on the other hand are mighty fine, especially in purple!

With the hall empty of nearly everyone and everything, it gave me chance to snipe some frames with the long telephoto lens and not worry about people/cars coming obstructing the view.

The pumped-up stance of Jack’s RX-7 is clear to see here. Those CarShopGlow LED tailights bring the already timeless Japanese icon up-to-date.

Once again, Jamie’s Prelude Type-S looking highly photogenik.

Roy Milward made a few transformative changes to his GC8 Impreza, notably the new paint and RS Watanabe wheels, of which I’ve never seen under a Scoobie.

The pearl/metallic orange/yellow possesses a great amount of depth that can only be fully appreciated outside in the sun and not under fluorescent artifical lighting.

The TommyKaira aero kit remains underneath the combination of paint and carbon. The addition of integrated intake-ducts in the headlight cluster blends nicely into the carbon bonnet. Also note the shaved rear door handles, giving me flashbacks of the HKS Cyber Evo.

Even with the car aired up, the driver has to carefully avoid scraping that front lip!

All in all, JPS seemed to have delivered on every front. Featuring the best of the best Jap metal here in the UK, I doubt anybody visiting left and felt short-changed. With plenty of variety in terms of manufacturer, style, and era, a balance was certainly achieved to cater for everybody’s interests.

As for me, I wished that I could enjoy the show, rather than being in work-mode the whole time, so to speak. I might consider selling framed prints again at future events, I’ll see where the wind takes me.

Closing out, I’d like to thank anyone who’s supported Soul Fokus. Whether you’ve shared the site or my photos with your friends and fam, or if you purchased a print that now resides on your wall. It’s appreciated 🙂

Katch you in the next one . . .

The H Factor – Part 3 | Mimms Honda Day @ Croft Circuit 2021

My aim is to give the UK car scene some prominence on a bigger scale. I’m not doing this for anything other than the pursuit of capturing the best of what we have over here when it comes to enthusiast culture. Immortalising the product of peoples’ passion and dedication to what some may consider “just another hobby”. For certain individuals, this is their life.

Likes and followers ought not to be a matter or quantity, but quality. What I mean by that is, if I waste my time chasing after “reach” or similar stats, 1000/10000/100000/1M won’t mean anything if: 1) What I’m providing is generic; 2) My work doesn’t have a direct effect on the reader, giving them some insight into the subject of an article or perhaps some inspiration to do what I’m trying to do; 3) I feel that it becomes a chore and end up doing this purely to strive for social media relevance.

If what you’ve seen and read resonates, then I’ll be glad to have put the work in wrapping up this event coverage piece for all of you.

On the day, track sessions were running throughout, giving everyone with a helmet and a sensibly-loud [is that a thing] car the chance for some seat-time. I think they ran for about 20 minutes at a time, so it wasn’t an open pitlane, trackday type of deal, but drivers could sign on more than one session. I suppose that’s convenient, because you and your car could let some steam off and then take a breather without pounding on it all day and being concerned about tyre/brake wear. It was fairly priced too, so if you didn’t take your machine out on track that day, you missed out! There’s always next time!

That morning, a pair of E92 M3s were garnering a bit of attention, unsurprisingly. Both wore mostly matching parts from what I remember, inside and out. Although, I think one was a Type R Limited or something…

BBS E88s measured 18″ in diameter, half-cage fitted behind the B-pillars, and functional stance gave these two BMWs that Euro Clubsport look.

The E92 3-series coupe is struggling to age.

I take it the owners of both M3s like to frequent the Green Hell. Croft Circuit probably felt like a playground to them.

The weather took a little dip around lunchtime, so that’s why some photos aren’t as sunny and colourful as others. Didn’t have an effect on how much presence this monochromatic R32 showed though.

FR machines took a back-seat that day, but a Skyline is a Skyline after all.

Bolt-on overfenders give the car some beef without the obnoxiousness, and also room to fit the Work Meister S1 split-rims.

Ridox bodyparts is all an A80 Supra really needs to ask for. But then to go and sit it on an iconic set of 3-spoke wheels in flat bronze! I don’t think you need a dictionary definition for the word sick-as-fuck.

A white EK hatch with painted USDM side mirrors appears! And then I saw a guy walk out and sit on the front wing, so I decided to go have a chinwag.

Every Civic I saw with that unmistakably shaped oil dipstick, I’d be on it like a fly to shit. Okay, that’s the wrong metaphor, but you get what I mean. If you don’t, all will become clear in a future blogpost *hint hint*. The owner planted a K24 engine from an Accord, and the numbers this thing allegedly churns out sounded like it could be a weapon for a nat-asp motor. To be honest, I just admire how nice that camcover looks 🙂

I’m pretty sure this EG was for sale.

OEM optional extras mixed in with aftermarket bits.

Gave me a USDM throwback kinda vibe, dunno why.

One very fast teal CR-X being hammered round Croft by owner Colin.

That K-Tuned shifter assembly is a clue as to why I said very fast.

Tidily swapped in a K-series, not a bad idea eh?

Whatever was in this EK coupe, the driver was exploiting every measurable ounce of it.

Tom – whose old NA MX-5 was hands down the sickest I’ve ever come across in the UK – was someone I followed on IG because you could tell by the execution of his every idea was done with precision and tact. Then all of a sudden, I stopped seeing his Advan-liveried Roadster on my timeline. Well, this is the reason. A Datsun Sunny Truck with a Honda heart transplant. Even if you’re against the whole “inter-brand engine-swapping”, you’ll have a hard time criticizing Tom’s work of brilliance.

I didn’t know wtf I was looking at, but it ripped every time it passed by out on track. As we were leaving, I made sure to grab a snap of it. Upon closer inspection it was a Corolla GT, whatever that is. Sat pretty on RE30s though.

Strictly B-series here.

Sep and his Accord Euro-R on their way out.

All in all – as if it weren’t obvious – a good time was had by all…

…except that one EP3 that got trailered off track.

JDM CR-V with some hench OEM-spec rainguards.

That day happened to also be the Euro 2020 final, which as we know, a lot will be trying to forget about. Anyhow, everybody seemed to, not be in a rush, but packed up their belongings earlier than expected. The weather looked like it was taking another turn aswell. Let’s hope this minter of a yellow EK9 here got home dry.

Finally, all that I have in my “Mimms Croft 2021” folder has been uploaded and shared with you who’ve held on ’til here. Extra bonus photos will be posted up on my Facebook and Instagram pages.

Thanks for tuning in, share the blog if you want, and I hope to katch your attention next time!

The H Factor – Part 2 | Mimms Honda Day @ Croft Circuit 2021

If you’re back for more, you’ll be glad you came by once you’ve reached the bottom of this page. Or, if you’ve stumbled upon this somewhere on the net, don’t forget to check out what I kaptured in Part 1.

I’ll stretch out this mid-section of the three-parter to be the meatiest one. So buckle up, as I take you through the bulk of the Mimms Croft Edition 2021 gallery.

Let’s kick off with a golden oldie. Referring to this 1970s vintage gem as an oldie is probably disrespectful, actually. After all, it is the origin of the legendary reputation Honda has upholded all these years.

As the rear sticker indicates, this car would pass as a museum piece found in Honda’s Hall of Fame situated within the grounds of Twin Ring Motegi.

If you’re on the same level as me when it comes to automotive IQ, then the RS badge also may have thrown you off. Not due to it being commonly found on cars made by Audi, but the fact that the Honda RS badge reaches as far back as the first-gen Civic. I only knew of the Honda Fit (Jazz for us UKDM bois), which (in the Asian markets) was available in RS trim during productions runs of the GE and GK chassis.

Unlike the Fit RS – a “sportier” model with slight suspension stiffening – this Civic was used as an attempt at making a civilian car fun to drive; regardless of its drivetrain layout. You could even consider this model Honda’s initial spark to that FF flame, passed on throughout the decades until 1997, the inception of the EK9 Type R.

Honda managed to extract 20bhp+ over the base model’s engine spec. Using twin-carburettors and a freer-flowing intake manifold, this little firecracker puts out 75bhp from its 1.2 single-cam engine. That’s around 125bhp/tonne though (if Wikipedia tells me right) so I bet it makes for some good slow-car-fast thrills. Oh, and RS stands for Road Sailing, if you care to know.

Here’s a couple interior shots I got of the Prelude sat next to it.

Another car imported by BHP Imports was this nifty EG, wearing white on white. I think the owner has a thing for Toda Racing.

First Molding carbon front-lip is enough to complete the face of a street-friendly B-series EG.

Here’s a car I did expect to see atleast one of, but not in this guise.

Its difficult to not get excited seeing an NA1 NSX. The number of shots Hamza and I took of Amer’s car will solidify that fact. But this isn’t any old supersportscar Honda made back in the day.

As remarkable as the machine is in stock form, there’s always potential for enhancement. For you lot old enough to remember and fortunate enough to not forget, this NSX in particular may be recognizable to you. This used to be a demo car belonging to Trial Japan!

The current owner has kept true to the original aesthetic, but at the same time turned it up a few notches with the JGTC-style livery. The front bumper is made by Taitec, a company whom I think run/ran NA1 and NA2 NSXs in Super Taikyu Endurance Series. The rest of the kit I’m unsure of. Whatever the widebody is, it looks mighty fine.

Oh, did I not mention its got a turbo hanging off the back of it? This thing doesn’t just look the part, you know.

As is visible from the interior shots, the premium cabin feel hasn’t been sacrificed in the name of racecar.

The owner (pictured) seemed a cool guy too, offering to open the doors and hatch for people who wanted a gander. Shame it wasn’t allowed on track due to noise violations.

Amer’s brother brought his normal NSX.

Moving back on over to FF Hondas. For me, this grey EK hatch looked the part.

Must have been the SE37s, a design that ranks in my top 3.

I suppose its boosted B-series unit is cool too. Bit miffed that I didn’t get to hear it make a racket; oh well.

An award-worthy EG6 SiR; a Honda some would regard the Holy Grail of 5th-gens.

Simple recipes stand the test of time, so its no wonder this black Civic on white TEs won top prize for “Best Exterior”. Spoon Sports goods give the body a bit more of a pronounced profile by way of a carbon front-lip and rear duckbill spoiler.

From what I remember, the interior was immaculate enough to win its own award. Dash-dodger roll-cage paired up with a set of Recaro SR3s in red, and its ready to attack any backroad bend!

Save the money you spend on drugs, and go purchase a LSD.

Another star of the show, this EK4 Jordan managed to win over the judges, not with its memorabilia collection on the parcel shelf, but in fact with its Sprint Hart Type-D wheels! And yes, I had to research wtf they were, because I’ve never seen a set on anything ever. Their design remind me of classic rally wheels, but this Civic isn’t going anywhere near a ditch let alone off-road.

Engine bay cleanliness to a T.

So, the story goes (Wikipedia comes through once again) in the late 1990s, cigarette-bans forced F1 teams to flip the script with their promo & marketing. Benson & Hedges were the primary sponsor for Eddie Jordan’s clique, so the cars had to retain the B&H namesake someway or another. Apparently, someone had an idea of slappin’ Buzzin Hornets on the side of their Formula car, and that was that! I reckon it had something to do with Team Jordan hearing what straight-piped B16s sound like at full-whack.

If you don’t know what I mean, go and YouTube “No Good Racing Osaka Kanjozoku”.

This is what dedication looks like. Bonkers. As if they made and sold a Jordan disposable camera! The owner ain’t getting rid of that, or any of his other souvenirs, for sure.

Is the Spoon livery played out yet?…

Nahh, probably not.

Teeky’s EK4 SiR-II(?) These things are rare as they Civics come.

Unicorn-spec for sure, those gold badges are regal as fuck.

I’m gonna dip out here, but don’t you worry, we’re not done yet.

I hope you enjoyed the blah-blah and the photos of course. As you’ve just witnessed, my start to summer show season has been class. But “where’s that trackside vibe?!” I hear you scream.

I gotchu…