As Below, So Above | Mimms Honda Day 2021 @ Three Sisters Circuit

September is usually the month that can’t decide whether it’s done with summer, or isn’t yet ready for autumn. It’s like that transition period between good times in not-bad weather, and the kold seasons of hibernation and/or winter projects. The ninth month of the years also happens to be suitable timing for an “end-of-show-season” show. Dav and co. came back up north to Three Sisters Circuit in Wigan to put on exactly that.

With the Civik being “fully” road-ready with its recently calibrated ECU courtesy of Jesse ‘JCal’ Halford, the event was an opportunity for me to give the car a proper-ish shakedown. So on 26th September, over to Lancashire I went, camera gear and Arai lid in hand, to check out what Hondas other Northerners would bring out to the show.

You might have spotted the title and are wondering what I mean by it. Well, I’m gonna have to admit that maybe until only recently – say, a few months ago – I had a pretty cynical and negative view of the “scene” here in the north end of England. I’ve always had a somewhat bleak perception of how cars are modified up these ways. Don’t get me wrong, I’m fully aware that high-quality builds do exist, but I still do think they’re either few and far between, or they just don’t really see the light of day that often.

It’s been a classic case of “greener grass on the other side” and all the sick cars I’ll see online based in the UK, will be down south, up in Scotland, or over in Ireland. I’d say my awareness has expanded, especially since the Mimms event put on at Croft. For years, all I’ve ever really consumed in terms of car-related information has been via the worldwide-web. The events and meets I’ve attended locally haven’t really ever blown me away. I mean, there’d be a few cool things that I’d never seen before and happen to be owned by someone in a neighbouring city/county, but I dunno, here in the UK not many people have the disposable income to invest into their builds (or the patience to save up funds). But this also makes me appreciate those that do have the persistence and patience to hold onto their hard-earned money for those genuine parts, instead of blowing it all on shoddy rep wheels and eBay bodykits.

That leads me on to this nigh-on perfect example of a pre-facelift EP3 Civic Type R.

I hold my head in shame for not taking more photos of this, as it was undeniably one of the cleanest seventh-gens I’ve ever laid eyes on.

EP3 is a chassis code synonymous with the UK Honda scene, unsurprisingly, as the car was assembled on our nation’s land. Unfortunately, a lot of them are either hideous thanks to the owners’ and their bad choices in modifications, or the sills have shit themselves beyond repair.

At Mimms, it was nice to come across one that the owner truly cared about, and it showed. I’m sure the owner told me the odometer read around 80,000 miles, but the paint looks like it’s got half that figure on it.

K-Tuned dress-up bits all over the K20A2.

I booked a 20-minute track session as soon as I parked up in the back corner of the car park (can’t blame Mimms staff for putting me there, the paint was/still is a shambles). Whilst I waited until it was my time to put the stock suspension to the test on the go-kart track, I went for a stroll and browsed the show-and-shine stand.

Carl Plant’s EG Civic has a trick or two up under its bonnet, so don’t let that mellow Carnival Yellow paint fool you.

The car’s front end features moderately aggressive modifications consisting of a Mugen lip, custom canards and foglight blanking plates, along with the classic swap-in of the JDM amber-indicators.

Uber-rare rims made by Work Wheels back in whatever decade, these Pietra Corse items are JDM gold dust no doubt! Looking at other sets online, they featured a centre hub cover that resembled a centre-lock nut, so I’m guessing these are from the mid-to-late 1990s.

Dunno if that was litter or the owner was saving his drink for later?

Pretty unsuspecting interior with a pair of blue Recaro SR4 recliners *hint hint*…

…and a Spoon Sports steering wheel. But peep that AFR gauge made by AEM to the right-hand side of the steering column.

Oh, and the wastegate exit-pipe showing it’s teardrop-shaped tip out the bonnet’s matching cut-out.

This FF terror in fact moves under K-series power. Not only that, but the engine conversion has been treated to a few more molecules of available oxygen by way of a Pulsar GT3071R turbocharger, effectively doubling the stock K20 output to ~400bhp @ 13psi.

I can imagine this boosted EG wakes the driver up better than any type of caffeine-containing beverage can.

On the subject of EG Civics, Nav brought out his Bayside Blue K-swapped hatchback.

If you also thought that yellow one was sleeper status, this one is a proper under-the-radar build.

Sparco L999 wheel with thumb-positioned horn buttons gives me that nostalgic 2000s feeling. Only just pictured in the same frame is the Pioneer Carozzeria double-DIN headunit with the remote control resting in a vent-mount.

OZ Futura Monoblocks are being rocked in a 17″ sizing under car, and they don’t look bad for a size-up wheel setup.

GReddy decal on the hatch representing the Supreme tailpipe exiting below the rear bumper.

Elmo wasn’t ready for the ‘TEC.

I believe Nav has since let the car go to a new owner, but this scale model will remain in his hands as a memory of the modern classic Honda he put together.

A few Mugen-looking bits on this DC5 Integra Type R.

The morning started off good, only to be made great once I saw Mr. Restomod Compulsion’s NA1 NSX parked – by default – in the show & shine line-up.

Voltex wing sits sky-high atop the custom-CNC’d stands.

Real rekognise real.

Pearly whites break up the deep black bodywork.

The angle of attack of the wing has been intentionally crafted with knife-edge precision. Not too tall, with just enough rake.

Stainless exhaust tubes visible thanks to the modified rear bumper and the minimalist diffuser set-up with its carbon fibre support rods.

VIP-style elements in the interior with the Junction Produce leather neck pad cushions. Seems he’s associated with the bloods, too.

Gold sticker = winner winner.

Moving on (it was difficult) from the NSX, here we have a CR-X VTi with nothing much going on, except…

… a snail to provide that supplemental kick up the arse.

Half-size radiator must be doing a good enough job to keep coolant temps in check, even with a load of boost chucked into the mix.

I like how the owner just strapped the turbo onto a custom manifold and left nearly everything else in sight stock. Even the location of the oil catch can is subtle enough to go by unnoticed.

This driver looks like he took a detour through Racoon City.

Wouldn’t normally pay much attention to an FN2 – unless maybe if it happened to be a Mugen 20 – but I like it when video games are used as inspiration for car modification.

Geeky, I know.

The vegans of the automotive community, haha.

Emotion XT7 in bronze WORK well on this OEM+ DC5.

Bonnet was missing, so I went over to have a nosey in the bay.

EP3 electric power steering conversion was odd, but each to their own, eh? It kinda cleans up the frontmost part of the engine bay, to be fair.

First and only big whoops that occurred on track that day.

I’ll insert this interlude amongst all the Honda content.

Mimms Honda Day magnetizes quality, regardless of manufacturer.

The original Gojira can’t get turned away, that would be plain silly.

Not like Mimms would turn anybody away, but the carpet has to get rolled out for JDM royalty.

Nardi Personal Neo Grinta sits centre stage in the driver’s position.

White armor, bronze gauntlets.

Okay, back to regular programming.

A pretty clean second-gen CR-X pictured, with its owner in the right of the frame. Glad he went out on track for a little play, after all, Hondas are for driving!

I had to scratch my head a bit after recognizing the plate on this EK. Turns out I saw it the month before at Japanese Performance Show! Looks kool, especially seeing what it sports under the bonnet. Ride height is also very korrect.

Not a bad choice of wheel, even if I do say so myself. Brakes look a bit dwarfed behind those 16″s though.

Business up front…

… business out back, too, from the looks of it, with the busy busy half-cage rigged up behind the Corbeau fixed-back driver’s seat and OEM passenger chair.

Atleast he’s doing it right running disc brakes in the rear, whereas I’ve left the original drum brakes in place on the Civik.

Old boy brought out his pride and joy, a BB8 Prelude VTi with that fancy four-wheel steering.

I’m not a Prelude nerd or anything, I learned what chassis code the car was based on from looking at the VIN plate rivetted right on top of the front cross member.

Coating on the heatshield looks factory fresh!

Stay klassy…

… or not.

Olly Ward made an appearance, this time entering his EG3 Civic into show & shine.

A 15 inch wheel that’ll look as good as TE37s do on anything, prove me wrong.

The guy leaning on Olly’s Honda is not Olly. I don’t know if Olly was friends with him or what, but the guy obviously has no manners, as he just interrupts me having a convo with Olly.

I won’t say much about this car, because I’m planning on leaving that for a full feature that’s yet to be shot whenever the stars align and the shit weather pisses off.

Self-fulfilling prophecy, as Olly’s Civic DX went on to win the award for best wheels IIRC.

Spoon N1 not looking as disgraceful as the one on the Civik.

Mine melted the rear bumper, so it has hardened plastic stuck to it. I’ve since lowered the tailpipe using rubber hanger mounts with wider hole spacing.

Hopefully see more of this machine and its owner in the near future.

Classic by design.

Plenty Personal steering wheels fitted to a lot of the cars at the show, what is this like the fourth one now???

Very OG 57CR by RAYS’ Gram Lights brand.

Other than the black NSX you saw earlier, this DC2 Integra Type R wore a set of Desmond Regamaster EVO wheels in Satin Black.

The car let off a very aggressive vibe, shame the driver took off so soon as I didn’t see it hang about for long.

OEM Recaro SR3 seats retained whilst TRS harnesses are hooked up to anchor points behind.

The only EF that caught my eye at the show.

Could it have been the OZ Racing split rims with gold centres and plain lips…

…or maybe it was just the ShirtTuckedIn decal on the rear side-window.

Whatever it was, it looked damn spiffy.

That time came around quick, where Dav picks up the mic and announces the award-winning contestants.

I’m shit at remembering names, but congrats to you, Restomod-Man, and your NSX taking the prize home yet again for 2021.

As the show started to wind down after the awards ceremony, I made a B-Line for the reception to book yet another track sesh in the Civik.

Check out the clip of some of the good laps from the day 🙂

A few FD2 Civic Type Rs came out to represent the 4-door VTEC klub.

FEEL’s stainless muffler tucked under all cosy beneath the FEEL’s rear diffuser with integrated LED fog/rainlight.

Infinite Power.

18″ CE28 by RAYS Volk Racing with polished lip guarding the Brembo caliper and disc assembly.

Under the cloudy sky, Premium Purple Pearl didn’t look as great as it could.

A lad in another red (actually red, should I say) EK hatch was lapping the carpark trying to find a spot, and he kept eyeing up my car and the empty space beside it. He eventually pulls up beside mine whilst I’m sat in the car charging my phone before I hit the track so that I was able to pair up my Hondata app to monitor coolant and oil temps whilst giving it a rip. He approaches me and for whatever reason sensed that there was something amiss with mine, so I popped the bonnet and revealed the non-surprise (I mean, it’s a K-swap, it’s kinda expected in this day and age).

Seeing someone else get excited about the Civik – whom I’d known for about 35 seconds – was cool, especially considering the sorry state the exterior was/is in. But, then again, it’s what lies beneath skin-deep that matters most, and Hondas are renowned for their inner workings. I’m going to begin the chassis/suspension enhancements in 2022, to start tapping into that FF potential.

Hope you enjoyed the read and pics, continue for more!

| B O N U S G A L L E R Y |

The H Factor – Part 2 | Mimms Honda Day @ Croft Circuit 2021

If you’re back for more, you’ll be glad you came by once you’ve reached the bottom of this page. Or, if you’ve stumbled upon this somewhere on the net, don’t forget to check out what I kaptured in Part 1.

I’ll stretch out this mid-section of the three-parter to be the meatiest one. So buckle up, as I take you through the bulk of the Mimms Croft Edition 2021 gallery.

Let’s kick off with a golden oldie. Referring to this 1970s vintage gem as an oldie is probably disrespectful, actually. After all, it is the origin of the legendary reputation Honda has upholded all these years.

As the rear sticker indicates, this car would pass as a museum piece found in Honda’s Hall of Fame situated within the grounds of Twin Ring Motegi.

If you’re on the same level as me when it comes to automotive IQ, then the RS badge also may have thrown you off. Not due to it being commonly found on cars made by Audi, but the fact that the Honda RS badge reaches as far back as the first-gen Civic. I only knew of the Honda Fit (Jazz for us UKDM bois), which (in the Asian markets) was available in RS trim during productions runs of the GE and GK chassis.

Unlike the Fit RS – a “sportier” model with slight suspension stiffening – this Civic was used as an attempt at making a civilian car fun to drive; regardless of its drivetrain layout. You could even consider this model Honda’s initial spark to that FF flame, passed on throughout the decades until 1997, the inception of the EK9 Type R.

Honda managed to extract 20bhp+ over the base model’s engine spec. Using twin-carburettors and a freer-flowing intake manifold, this little firecracker puts out 75bhp from its 1.2 single-cam engine. That’s around 125bhp/tonne though (if Wikipedia tells me right) so I bet it makes for some good slow-car-fast thrills. Oh, and RS stands for Road Sailing, if you care to know.

Here’s a couple interior shots I got of the Prelude sat next to it.

Another car imported by BHP Imports was this nifty EG, wearing white on white. I think the owner has a thing for Toda Racing.

First Molding carbon front-lip is enough to complete the face of a street-friendly B-series EG.

Here’s a car I did expect to see atleast one of, but not in this guise.

Its difficult to not get excited seeing an NA1 NSX. The number of shots Hamza and I took of Amer’s car will solidify that fact. But this isn’t any old supersportscar Honda made back in the day.

As remarkable as the machine is in stock form, there’s always potential for enhancement. For you lot old enough to remember and fortunate enough to not forget, this NSX in particular may be recognizable to you. This used to be a demo car belonging to Trial Japan!

The current owner has kept true to the original aesthetic, but at the same time turned it up a few notches with the JGTC-style livery. The front bumper is made by Taitec, a company whom I think run/ran NA1 and NA2 NSXs in Super Taikyu Endurance Series. The rest of the kit I’m unsure of. Whatever the widebody is, it looks mighty fine.

Oh, did I not mention its got a turbo hanging off the back of it? This thing doesn’t just look the part, you know.

As is visible from the interior shots, the premium cabin feel hasn’t been sacrificed in the name of racecar.

The owner (pictured) seemed a cool guy too, offering to open the doors and hatch for people who wanted a gander. Shame it wasn’t allowed on track due to noise violations.

Amer’s brother brought his normal NSX.

Moving back on over to FF Hondas. For me, this grey EK hatch looked the part.

Must have been the SE37s, a design that ranks in my top 3.

I suppose its boosted B-series unit is cool too. Bit miffed that I didn’t get to hear it make a racket; oh well.

An award-worthy EG6 SiR; a Honda some would regard the Holy Grail of 5th-gens.

Simple recipes stand the test of time, so its no wonder this black Civic on white TEs won top prize for “Best Exterior”. Spoon Sports goods give the body a bit more of a pronounced profile by way of a carbon front-lip and rear duckbill spoiler.

From what I remember, the interior was immaculate enough to win its own award. Dash-dodger roll-cage paired up with a set of Recaro SR3s in red, and its ready to attack any backroad bend!

Save the money you spend on drugs, and go purchase a LSD.

Another star of the show, this EK4 Jordan managed to win over the judges, not with its memorabilia collection on the parcel shelf, but in fact with its Sprint Hart Type-D wheels! And yes, I had to research wtf they were, because I’ve never seen a set on anything ever. Their design remind me of classic rally wheels, but this Civic isn’t going anywhere near a ditch let alone off-road.

Engine bay cleanliness to a T.

So, the story goes (Wikipedia comes through once again) in the late 1990s, cigarette-bans forced F1 teams to flip the script with their promo & marketing. Benson & Hedges were the primary sponsor for Eddie Jordan’s clique, so the cars had to retain the B&H namesake someway or another. Apparently, someone had an idea of slappin’ Buzzin Hornets on the side of their Formula car, and that was that! I reckon it had something to do with Team Jordan hearing what straight-piped B16s sound like at full-whack.

If you don’t know what I mean, go and YouTube “No Good Racing Osaka Kanjozoku”.

This is what dedication looks like. Bonkers. As if they made and sold a Jordan disposable camera! The owner ain’t getting rid of that, or any of his other souvenirs, for sure.

Is the Spoon livery played out yet?…

Nahh, probably not.

Teeky’s EK4 SiR-II(?) These things are rare as they Civics come.

Unicorn-spec for sure, those gold badges are regal as fuck.

I’m gonna dip out here, but don’t you worry, we’re not done yet.

I hope you enjoyed the blah-blah and the photos of course. As you’ve just witnessed, my start to summer show season has been class. But “where’s that trackside vibe?!” I hear you scream.

I gotchu…

Japanaholik’s Journal | Goodnight, Tokyo, Good Morning, Osaka

The thing with Japan is that it has pockets of unique culture and ways of life projected in every different part of the country. On this trip, I made sure to pen in Osaka on the itinerary. In terms of like general knowledge, all I knew of Osaka was how apparently insanely addictive their cuisine is, its home to electronics giant Panasonic, and also a tourist selfie-hotspot in the form of the ‘Glico’ man.

What they don’t show on TV though, is that Osaka is the breeding ground of the hardcore Japanese tuning scene. ‘5Zigen’ have their head office in the prefecture, ‘Trial’ is also situated in Osaka, as are the GT-R maestros ‘Auto Select’, that used “JDM-car” heaven ‘Global Auto’, ‘Kakimoto Racing’ high performance exhaust specialists, and of course the infamous Kanjozoku has its origins in this western part of Japan. That list is only the tip of the iceberg, as you could wander in a rural countryside in Japan and stumble across, oh I dunno, ‘Fujita Engineering’ (which I did intentionally stumble upon; all will be revealed in a future post).

I was advised by Uncle, that the most efficient way to get to Osaka without breaking the bank with a shinkansen (bullet-train) ticket, would be to hop on an overnight bus. So, with seats reserved for the long and dark 350+ mile journey, we just chilled out during the day.

We tagged along with Uncle who was checking up on some work-related matters.

On return back to his house, Uncle got me to pilot his lardy Land Cruiser to the local Super Autobacs which is pretty much Halfords but with more than you could ever need; it is THE autoparts dealer of Japan. This store in particular had a cafe, arcade, bookshop/memorbilia emporium, and a sportswear shop on top floor of all things.

Nothing much else to note during that day and evening, skip to us arriving in Osaka at 7am the next morning. It is hard to get a decent sleep on a moving coach, especially when they have to make regular breaks along the route. Needless to say, I was very groggy getting into Osaka, but my first impressions were that it was a bit more rough around the edges in comparison to Tokyo.

Walking through the city, it was easy to see it was an actively industrial place, with a lot of HGVs present on the streets dashing to and from the shipping ports that make all that international business possible.

I don’t normally look twice at E36 chassis BMWs, but that fire & sun pair parked up back-to-back made me take a closer peek. Good sets of bronze wheels and a drop in ride height results in maximum effect on street cars.

Saw that EK Civic in the corner of my eye as it seemingly floated by with a low-pitch grumble emitted from its exhaust. I should have chased it, but we were dealing with a bicycle rental rep and I didn’t want to be rude and just duck out. Also, he probably would have been weirded out by me running after a Honda to get a photo. If I were to eventually get an EK9, I’d get that sucka sprayed straight red, or maybe Sakhir Orange. As classic as the timeless Champ White colour is on the little hatchback, I think that generation of Civic definitely suits darker hues better.

With our trusty, fully manual two-wheelers, we set out in the direction we were told the Osaka Castle was in, by asking random pedestrians at every traffic light until we found it, basking in all its glory under the low sun.

I’ll leave it at that for this post. Not really anything special, it was just a bunch of photos I took that (for the most part) were not car-related. The next day was a bit more interesting though, so watch out for that post.

V V V B O N U S G A L L E R Y V V V

Japanaholik’s Journal | Supreme Klassiks of the Golden Era

The plan after the Lowstars Meeting in Nikko was to bolt over to Tochigi City, where a private kollection of incredible automobiles are nestled away under the roof of an old train JR (Japan Railway) station.

The ‘Mahoujin Supercar Museum’ is deceiving on first encounter; it seems like an old, unused building that has been preserved for the local community or something of that nature. But step past the ticket barriers (after you pay for admission) and what welcomes you is pretty astonishing.

The cars you are about to see are what I believe to be the pinnacle of supercar history. The 90’s machines have that perfect balance between technology and rawness, and the cars that predate that decade are pure analogue bliss.

I am sure you will spot some of your all-time favourites in this assortment…

… ‘cos I know I did when I caught this red Delta HF Integrale Evo 2 sitting in the corner of the gallery.

The dudes you see gathering around that Porsche 959 arrived at the museum in a convoy, one had some kind of Mercedes 2-door coupe which didn’t peak as much of my interest as the FD2 Civic Type-R (which I probably should have chosen to rent out instead of the Integra) and the two Alfa Romeo saloons. Dare I say, the Italian 4-doors beat the heck out of the Honda with their sharp looks.

Upon exit, the owners of these cars followed behind and they got chatting after they caught me taking photos of that black 159. I vented my frustration with the rental car, so they offered to phone the company and give them a very polite, Japanese earful. Nothing came out of it really, but at least they tried. A couple of them reckoned it was a faulty crank/cam angle sensor, which I also speculated, but that wouldn’t explain the nasty throttle pedal feel.

Thats all I have for this one, the visit was more of a bucket list check-off than anything, and since it happened to be along the route to our stop in Tsukuba, I thought I’d might aswell pay it a visit.

The post to follow is gonna be exciting, as you might have guessed by the aforementioned destination…

VVV B O N U S R E E L VVV

First Visit to Japan; Another World

It was bound to happen, but this journey out to the ‘land of the rising sun’ came to manifest unexpectedly for me. I can say it was destined, you could say it was just coincidence. My father’s childhood friend who lived in the same village when they were both growing up in India, had travelled further east, and ended up working and settling in Japan. My dad kept in contact with him, I think, on and off meeting up to reminisce whenever their trips to India coincided, or the one time he and his Japanese family visited England years before I can properly remember.

Fast-forward to 2016, almost as if it was at random, my parents had booked flights to Japan and I can remember not being particularly excited at the time. Maybe I was just stunned and could not grasp the fact that it was actually happening.

Anyhow, you will now view the gallery of photos I snapped when I was out there. 59 is the image count, so commentary will be dialled down to the minimum and the pictures will paint the scene. Enjoy…

On the drive from the Narita International Airport, I was armed ready with my camera. The journey to my Uncle’s home was mainly through rural settings, occasionally passing through small parts of town. This was a Mazda I had never laid eyes on before, in all its basic-looking blandness.
Traditional Japanese buildings are a thing of beauty, so much so, it feels blasphemous referring to them as things. More like pieces of art.
Wakaba means ‘young leaf’ in Japanese. It is also the word used to describe the yellow and green symbol found on all these “JDM as f*ck” cars that you see and used as a symbol with an alternative meaning. In Japan, its originally intended purpose was for inexperienced/new drivers to be made known to others on the road, analogous to the ‘L/P’ plates in the UK.
Welcome to Autobacs, the Japanese version of Halfords (kinda). And yes, they sell SSR alloys. This is scratching the surface, but unfortunately I did not manage to get many good photos of the other items for sale, mainly due to the crazily extensive options. You name it, they got it. Then there’s the ‘Super Autobacs’ stores. I never paid one a visit, but from what I have seen online; whole other level.

Literally a minute walk around the corner from where we were staying, this gem of a find which goes by the name ‘Body Make Kazu’ stopped me in my tracks gobsmacked, and this was only Day 2 of the holiday! It was what seemed like three separate buildings in close proximity, perhaps owned by one guy or family run. It comprised of two small garages, a medium-sized storage unit, and then a little single story office/reception building across the road. Very odd, but outside on the yard was a plethora of all sorts. The Liberty Walk GTR obviously caught my attention, but not as much as the cold stock silver RX7 FD. All this wickedness in some random, remote village in Kamagaya about 25 miles away from the airport.

These boxy beaters are ace and look like fun to chuck about on the touge.
Enroute to Hakone, near Mt. Fuji

The highlight of the trip without a doubt. I rented an FD from a small but growing business called ‘Fun2Drive’. Without going into too much detail, the RX7 was a machine that did everything right. The perfect sports car, front to back. Oh yeah, the roads in Japan’s mountainous areas are sublime.

This red legend will be revisited in a future post.

The first R34 GTR I saw on Japanese roads. I went bananas, the people on the bus must have been weirded out.

I almost didn’t get the chance to experience 7’s day that year. But thanks to the typical friendliness of the Japanese, a scenario played out that was written in the stars, for real. Long story short, I was young and dumb, I failed to plan, realised at the wrong time that Daikoku Parking Area is access-only via vehicle, a bystander who had just finished work in the evening offered to take my parents and I into the service station. For me, even that very short 15 minutes, felt like complete heaven.

The Land-Jet…
Tokyo’s tree in the sky
I found that the Japanese are really enthusiastic when it comes to cars. A big surprise to me, was the amount of non-Japanese marques, like this Mini. Very cool to see.
Roll on chrome… back to the early 00’s

Another tuner/service garage a few streets down from my uncle’s house. This place, ‘Seed Racing Car Engineering’, seemed like it was serious. I am regretting not taking enough photos, being overwhelmed by it all. What a place…

My last day in Japan on that trip. I went for a walk around the neighbourhood’s surrounding area and these final three images conclude this post well. That stall was selling fresh blueberries I think. Unmanned, the CCTV camera caught anybody trying to ‘do the dirty’ and not pay the 300 yen (~£2) in exchange for a box. Also, for some reason, I took a liking to the houses out there. The design of their residential buildings are cool and each house had character. I used to play Pokemon on the GameBoy Colour, and weirdly enough, it felt like I was venturing through one of the fictional towns and villages from the game. Odd, I know…